First Video Game: What Was the First Video Game?

The first video game was created in 1947 by William Higinbotham, who developed Tennis for Two as an attraction to draw visitors to the Brookhaven National Laboratory after World War II ended. But what was the first video game? There are several options, including games like OXO (released in 1952) and Spacewar! (created in 1962), but they were technically computer games rather than video games because they relied on text-based graphics rather than images on a screen. Here at Duck Blogs, we go to the beginning of video gaming.

The Beginning

Scientists have been working on creating interactive games for years. Ralph Baer, who is known as the father of video games and developed a number of popular Atari titles like Pong, created his first rudimentary game in 1951—more than 20 years before Nolan Bushnell and Ted Dabney would release Computer Space at Nutting Associates. The game was called Tennis For Two and could only be played by two people using two separate control boxes. The participants faced each other across a net that came down from the ceiling with their controls situated on either side of it. Players would serve by moving the ball up from their side of the net to hit it over to their opponent’s side. Their opponent then tried to return it back over the net so they could get a point or win the game

Pac-Man, one of the First Arcade video game

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Pac-Man has sold more than 300,000 arcade machines worldwide and was a hot seller in both Japan and North America. The player controls Pac-Man through a maze, eating pac-dots. When all pac-dots are eaten, Pac-Man is taken to the next stage. Enemies (ghosts) appear and pursue Pac-Man. If an enemy touches Pac-Man, a life is lost and the game is over. The ghost will temporarily turn blue if it eats a power pellet; this means that they can be killed for a limited time after they have otherwise returned to normal. Power pellets can be obtained by eating an energizer found at the corners of most levels, or by collecting 100 pellets that appear when enemies are killed. Every level contains four Wakka fruit which clears the entire screen of enemies and allows Pac-Man to eat freely for some seconds before being transported back to the starting point of that level.

8-bit/16-bit Console War Games

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The most popular video game console companies from both eras were Sega and Nintendo. These two companies battled each other for dominance in both consoles and games. During what was known as The Console Wars, 16-bit systems like Super Nintendo and Sega Genesis had their own share of memorable titles. Titles such as Super Mario World (SNES) and Sonic the Hedgehog (Genesis) are now recognized as classics that still enjoy a following to this day. However, there is one classic title that is considered by many to be the best 8-bit/16-bit title ever made. That title is Super Metroid (Super NES). It has an amazing atmosphere with vibrant colors and enemies along with an awesome soundtrack by Hirokazu Tanaka. It also introduced concepts such as backtracking or running around without any powerups on areas you couldn’t get through before; something not done before on an 8-bit system at all!

The Golden Age of PC Gaming

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Before there were personal computers, there was Pong. The game, launched in 1972 by Atari (then known as Atari Inc.), is often considered to be the first video game to hit it big. While other games may have come before Pong, it was likely one of a kind when it came out. It was simple enough for anyone to play with and offered some measure of interactivity. Although not everyone had access to a computer or even television at the time, this game provided an accessible experience that would set the stage for what would become gaming culture. And while its graphics are primitive compared to today’s standards, Pong proved that the possibilities for future gaming experiences were limitless.

Internet Gaming Leads to Multiplayer Battle Arenas

Before League of Legends and Call of Duty, games were played by two individuals. From two-person games like chess to four-person games like poker, for decades human beings competed directly against one another in order to win. Then in 1969, students at MIT started a video game development club called Tech Model Railroad Club (TMRC). This group of developers worked on creating computer software that simulated real-life systems (like train stations) in an effort to improve efficiency.

eSports All Over the World

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While a popular pastime in Asia, eSports is becoming more and more mainstream in Europe, North America, and Oceania. The average age of gamers playing online is about 30 years old. There are several games that have helped drive eSports popularity including League of Legends, Dota 2, Counter-Strike: Global Offensive, and StarCraft II. These games vary in size and complexity with some having over 100 playable characters to choose from (such as League of Legends) while others can be played on a small screen with little or no input from the player (such as Hearthstone). But what has made these titles so successful? They all include various modes that offer players different challenges, allowing them to focus on their strengths.

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